Cartographic Artillery

 »

Cartographic Artillery consists of a collection of maps that visualize where alleged weapons of mass destruction ought to be produced in Iraq, Iran and Syria. These assumptions were dangerously wrong and that these maps have been used as very false evidence.

Creation in times of turbulence

 »

Palestinian artist Khaled Hourani and Brussels-based designer Annelys de Vet started ‘Disarming Design’ in September 2012 with a design workshop at the International Academy of Arts Palestine. The duo invited artists, designers, and craftsmen to make contemporary products using existing production processes. A couple of vibrant, unpredictable, and very fruitful weeks followed in which two-dozen Palestinian cultural practitioners and three students from the Sandberg Instituut in Amsterdam collaborated. They visited several workplaces, not only in Ramallah, but also in Nablus, Hebron, and Bethlehem, to investigate the production processes, learn about the small-scale factories, and run experiments with the craftsmen and their materials. What follows are edited extracts of de Vet’s observations as the project unfolded…

Epilogue – Subjective atlas of Hungary

 »

At a quick, unsuspecting glance, the line between nationalism and talking about cultural identity looks hair-fine. As we were putting together the Subjective atlas of Hungary, this conflict was a constant subject of discussion. The atlas is meant to show cultural diversity and emphasize personal experience as part of the collective. It thereby underlines that culture is not static but in constant motion and different for everyone. This certainly does not mean we cannot talk about shared values or a national spirit. But how we talk about them is always a delicate matter that demands awareness, especially in the present period.

DE PERMANENTE REVOLUTIE / DE ONBEGONNEN REVOLUTIE

 »

Visual essay for literary magazine De Gids

Europe is in the eye of the beholder

 »

Poster reflecting on the image of Europe by Indian call centre employees

Creative Sheet

 »

Critical poster for exhibition ‘21 years of cultural posters’ by Design Vlaanderen

New designer’s application for 2012-2022

 »

Who are the people incubating within our design schools – the students who will emerge as the world’s Next Designers? What are their backgrounds, ambitions, doubts? How is this generation dealing with our current time-frame, dominated by media and technology? How will they use design to impact society? Do they have what it takes to meet the challenges of their chosen profession? Or is it they who ultimately will define these challenges, and reconstruct the profile of ‘designer’ for our future society. It is up to our schools not only to educate young designers, but to recognize them. In a fictional interview with a prospective student at the Sandberg Institute, design department head Annelys de Vet creates a portrait of a soon-to-be Next Designer.

Temporary Museum Amsterdam: Public debate based on sound bites

 »

The Temporary Museum Amsterdam programme runs parallel to Art Amsterdam and links the various contemporary art institutions. This year, the project is connected to My Name Is Spinoza and has been designed by the Sandberg Institute’s master’s students in design. The students have turned their attention to the political side of art. Baruch de Spinoza is said to have been the modern era’s first political thinker; he called himself a democrat and openly expressed his preference for the democratic state. According to him, the true state is one that offers liberty to everyone, even – or perhaps especially – those who think differently, practice other religions or express conflicting ideas. Some call Spinoza the founder of our democracy. But is that democracy still stable today?

Designing against populism or redefining design approaches

 »

Nearly a year ago, I started my job as head of the design department at the Sandberg Institute. The students sat around a table and took turns introducing themselves. Strikingly, most of them began with some variation of “I am not a graphic designer,” followed by a summary of all the things they did do. The term ‘graphic design’ seems to be attached to a definition that is stuck in the last century. This conversation illustrates that the profession is changing significantly. Design today forms a discourse and doesn’t so much exist as a book, poster or stamp; as a medium – it exists first of all ín the media. The meaning doesn’t lie anymore in the design itself but mainly in its relationship with its environment – in the context. In this lecture I’ll illustrate what this notion has meant for my own design practice.

Better a far neighbour as a good friend

 »

How wonderful it is not to be a tourist. Especially in places where there are hardly any tourists at all this time of the year, November. Beograd (literally: white city) is grey, dirty, crowded and different, especially so much different from other cities in the west. I am here for two weeks to make a “Subjective atlas of Serbia” together with artists and designers. In a personal way this group of Serbian creative persons is going to map out their country and daily lives. Direct involvement as a starting point to develop honest alternative images. All interviews we had about the work, combined with an overall view of all plans and intentions, directly touch the soul of society. For me it is a crash course in Serbian culture. Which appears to be more complex than expected.

La révolution de novembre 2006

 »

Deux importants prix nationaux furent remis à deux graphistes aux Pays-Bas à la fin de l'année dernière. Le prix Erasme(1) (€ 150.000,–) était placé sous le signe du graphisme pour le domaine public, et fut décerné à Pierre Bernard. Le prix du Prince Claus(2) (€ 100.000,–) fut décerné au graphiste iranien Reza Abedini pour sa manière personnelle d'adapter les connaissances et les acquis de l'héritage artistique iranien, en les renouvelant de façon passionnante. Les prix furent le motif d'ateliers, d'expositions et de discussions dans tout le pays. Jamais auparavant n'avais-je connu une telle effervescence autour du graphisme. Était-ce le début d'une nouvelle ère ?

Creativity is not about industry

 »

A couple of years ago I flew to Australia to work as a designer in residence. Although it was my first time out of Europe, arriving in Australia was quite disappointing. Flying to the other side of the world, I had expected a different society. People, cars, buildings, interiors and houses looked similar to what I’d seen before. But the moment I started to live in Melbourne, I was confronted with the many small differences. It was a totally different society. Don’t ask me why, but I started to collect small differences: – The sky is bigger – City’s are build for cars –Orange Juice is called ‘daily juice’ –‘Hi, how are you?’ is the first thing to say to anybody, also in supermarkets – The voice of people is softer (less loud) – In general, people are so polite. I find it hard to be the same – If you leave the door open, people ask you if you’re born in a tent. – In the Netherlands you would be asked whether you’re born in a church – On nameplates for artworks in museums, not only the year of birth and death of the artist is mentioned, also the year of arrival in Australia – Everything older then 100 years is considered ancient – I’ve never before been aware of how Dutch I actually am – For the first time in my life I feel that I am (a) ‘European’

Strange

 »

“Rules serve the people, and we cannot allow the people to serve the rules,” argued the Dutch MP Femke Halsema during the debate over ex-MP Ayaan Hirsi Ali’s naturalisation. She couldn’t have summed up the problem any more succinctly. The creative sector is crying out for a similar argument. It is becoming a pet of politicians, but there is a risk hanging in the air – one which has everything to do with the zeitgeist – that the creative industries will become an extension of political economic policy. After the industrial and digital revolutions, a creative revolution has evidently now dawned. The swing, however, must be and stay creative. The creative industries, as part of the field of the arts, must not be restrained. On the contrary, they need confidence, depth, experimentation, brainpower, and, especially, space. These things must come first, and rules only later.

Delirium

 »

Contribution publication 'Volume everything', Melbourne

Subjective Atlas of the EU from an Estonian point of view

 »

Kristjan Mändmaa: What is important in design? Annelys de Vet: Personal involvement and related ideas. Why are you a designer; what do you find appealing in design? Being able to investigate and develop ideas on society and culture, and transform the observations into useful ideas or even leave them as questions. You are constantly experimenting with different means and medias. Do you feel that everything is design or would you rather argue that these additional activities are merely attempts to seek variety and avoid boredom? The output of the work appears in different forms or media, but the input is always the same: ideas. The computer enables me to make videos, printed matter, sounds, images, drawings, websites, newspapers, posters, stamps and coins, all from the same position: sitting at a desk, countless mouse clicks, staring at a screen without a horizon. It’s not the medium that counts, it’s not the skill that matters, but it’s the attitude that makes the difference.

Rifle, 21st Century

MOOD BALLOT

 »

Mood Ballot for the election of the members of the House of Parliament

the Right to Copy

 »

I am Annelys de Vet. I am 6 hours of television a week I am 20 hours + 12 minutes + 43 seconds of telephone every 2 months I am at least 30 free mobile-call-minutes a month I am 6 SMS-messages a week I am 6 hours of computer a day I am 1 exhibition a week I am 10 e-mails a day I am 6 invitations a week I am 3 magazines a week I am 9 conversations a day I am theater twice a month I am 5 years secondary school + 5 years art school + 2,5 years postgraduate school I am 5 trial newspaper subscriptions a year I am 7 hours internet a week

Small differences